A capital challenge in Haiti

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 03:00
Until February 2011, Jean-Claude Seropian, a French hydraulic engineer, worked in Paris as director of operations of Suez Environnement, one of the world’s leading water and waste management companies. That month he moved to Haiti as head of a team of five technical, financial and management experts from Suez and two sister companies, Aguas de Barcelona and United Water. Their mission: to work with the staff of Port-au-Prince’s ailing water utility to arrest the decline of its services.

Recycling: an opportunity for change in Colombia

Monday, February 14, 2011 - 03:00
Colombians change their life and transform their family’s financial situation through a recycling project supported by the IDB Óscar Restrepo never imagined that recycling garbage could change his life. Previously a construction worker, he now owns a small business that gives him a monthly income of US$490 a month; six years ago his monthly earnings were only US$40.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

Inter-American Development Bank named Best Multilateral by LatinFinance

Friday, November 7, 2008 - 03:00
LatinFinance, the leading source of financial market intelligence for the Latin American and the Caribbean, named the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) as the best multilateral institution this year. LatinFinance praised the bank’s efforts to finance the largest ongoing infra-structure projects in the region, highlighting the bank’s innovative lending instruments.

IDB expands local-currency financing

Monday, April 14, 2008 - 03:00
The financial crisis of the 1980s and 1990s in Latin America has resulted in an increasing sophistication on the part of governments in the management of their monetary assets in the 21st century. This in turn has led to a growing interest by government financial leaders in diversifying their debt structure to reduce the risk of foreign exchange mismatches and an increasing preference for assuming a greater part of debt in national currencies as opposed to foreign currencies, usually U.S.

The $10 Billion Question: Which Investments Work Best?

Monday, March 31, 2008 - 03:00
*This article is presented as a website feature. It is part of the January-April 2008 issue of IDEA, an IDB newsletter on economic and social policy published three times a year.

A growing insurance market

Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 03:00
The insurance market is a $3.4 trillion business worldwide. According to a recent study by the Brazilian National School of Insurance (Funenseg by its Portuguese acronym), this market is growing faster in emerging economies, and forecasts for total global revenue point to 2.5 percent average annual growth over the coming years.

Empowering poor people to create wealth

Friday, June 23, 2006 - 03:00
When asked by IDB President Moreno what advice he would give to a newly elected Latin American President, Bill Clinton said that the most important thing would be to carry out microeconomic reforms to help people become entrepreneurs and move into the middle class, without getting bogged down in yesterday’s debate over fiscal responsibility versus unbridled social spending, neither of which have managed to lessen the world’s largest income gap.

Jamaica’s New Prime Minister Committed to Reaching the Majority

Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:00
Jamaican Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller, the first woman to lead her country’s government, plans to invest more in early childhood education, basic shelter and job training to help improve the lives of the disadvantaged in her island nation.