Young people with big ideas that transform society

Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 03:00
Participate and follow us on Twitter using @bidjuventud How does one solve old problems? With new ideas PANAMA CITY – We must listen to the voices of young people, with their fresh ideas and their plans for the future. And especially in Latin America and the Caribbean, the region with the world’s youngest population, where the average age is only 27.

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 03:00
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

United States and Latin America share experiences to prevent youth violence

Friday, September 14, 2012 - 14:01
Officials from the IDB and Latin America review lessons learned from U.S. youth programs The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) this week held a two-day training clinic with top specialists and law enforcement officials from the hemisphere, showcasing programs from Boston, Baltimore and San José, California as examples of best practices that could be adopted to help Latin America and the Caribbean combat youth crime.

Life Skills Count

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 - 03:00
Going beyond technical training to make at-risk youth employable There are 32 million young people in Latin America and the Caribbean—one in every five youth aged 15-29— that neither work nor study. In order to prepare these young people for workplace success, job training programs need to go beyond technical instruction and also teach “life skills,” such as communication, reliability, and teamwork.

A life beyond crime

Monday, August 27, 2012 - 18:30
A Jamaican citizen security program targets women involved in gangs For Pauline Crooks, quitting the Montego Bay gang that had helped her to put food on the table for six years wasn’t a quick or an easy decision. The single mother of three continued showing up at her “workplace”— where the gangsters ran lottery scams—even after she joined a parenting course offered by the Citizen Security and Justice Program (CSJP), an initiative launched in 2007 by Jamaica’s government to bring down crime in the island’s most violent communities.

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 03:00
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

IDB ramps up financing for green projects in Latin America and the Caribbean

Friday, March 16, 2012 - 03:00
Participate in Twitter using #IDBmtg Bank approved record $736 million in loans last year for private sector projects in renewable energy and energy efficiency The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is ramping up lending for private sector projects related to renewable energy and energy efficiency to help bridge the gap for long-term financing for green investments in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Youth employment: two ideas that work

Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 03:00
Participate in Twitter using #IDBmtg Multilateral Investment Fund uses sports and culture to teach life skills in youth training programs Youth unemployment is an important development challenge for Latin America and the Caribbean. There are unmet needs on both sides of the youth employment equation.

Fact Sheet: IDB and Youth Employment

Tuesday, December 20, 2011 - 03:00
Challenges of youth unemployment and underemployment Despite the relatively high economic growth Latin America and the Caribbean has experienced over the past few years, a significant portion of its population remains in poverty, including a large percentage of youth.

Renewable energy to power irrigation in the Atacama desert

Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 03:00
With support from the IDB, Subsole will be the first company in Chile’s fruit industry to use solar photovoltaic energy The Atacama desert is the driest place on earth and the region with the highest solar radiation on the planet. That’s where Subsole, one of the Chile’s largest locally owned exporters of table fruits, is planning its future growth, and it will use the power of solar energy and energy efficiency to achieve its goal.