Brazil’s Fisherwomen Mean Business

Friday, March 7, 2014 - 03:00
In Vila Castelo, a small town in the Brazilian state of Pará, fisherwomen are learning the ropes of fiscal management and entrepreneurship  Traditional fishing does not differ much today from what it has been since biblical times—a boat, a net, and a few men. Wait. Men? Maybe it has changed after all. At least in Vila Castelo, a tiny fishing village in Brazil’s state of Pará, women fish alongside men. 

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 03:00
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Life Skills Count

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 - 03:00
Going beyond technical training to make at-risk youth employable There are 32 million young people in Latin America and the Caribbean—one in every five youth aged 15-29— that neither work nor study. In order to prepare these young people for workplace success, job training programs need to go beyond technical instruction and also teach “life skills,” such as communication, reliability, and teamwork.

Haitian firm becomes Caracol Industrial Park's second tenant

Tuesday, July 24, 2012 - 03:00
Peintures Caraïbes plans to produce paint for the domestic market and to export to CARICOM countries CARACOL, Haiti – In a ceremony led by President Michel Martelly, Haitian paint manufacturer Peintures Caraïbes Tuesday signed a contract to become the second tenant of the Caracol Industrial Park, a project financed by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the United States government.

Youth and Employment: An Educational Disconnection

Tuesday, March 6, 2012 - 03:00
Schools are disconnected from job market demands in Latin America and the Caribbean, according to an IDB study Responsibility, communication, and creativity are some of the interpersonal skills demanded in today’s labor market. Yet young people in Latin America and the Caribbean aren’t developing these skills in school, according to an Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) study released today.

PROEMPLEO: turning challenges into jobs in Honduras

Tuesday, December 20, 2011 - 03:00
A win-win-win program for the government, the private sector and youth SAN PEDRO SULA, Honduras – Until not too long ago, Rony Barahona used to wake up at 4 am every day to join the lines of job seekers outside factories in the outskirts of this city, the Honduran industrial capital. Although smart and able-bodied, the 21-year-old would return home empty handed, with no money to support himself or his beloved mother.

Fact Sheet: IDB and Youth Employment

Tuesday, December 20, 2011 - 03:00
Challenges of youth unemployment and underemployment Despite the relatively high economic growth Latin America and the Caribbean has experienced over the past few years, a significant portion of its population remains in poverty, including a large percentage of youth.

Women entrepreneurs: too often trapped in the microenterprise ghetto

Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 03:00
Innovative approaches can boost women’s economic presence among small business owners in Latin America and the Caribbean Over the past three decades, women in Latin America and the Caribbean have dramatically increased their role in the workforce. Currently, about half of women in the region are economically active, more than double the level in the 1970s. They have been elected presidents of several Latin American countries and often dominate the microenterprise and microfinance sector, providing an important contribution to regional economies.

A chance for a better life

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 03:00
IDB helps provide life skills training and job placement for more than 47,000 Dominican at-risk youth   Social Transformation – story of a young future top chef

The challenge of pensions and social security in Latin America

Monday, May 23, 2011 - 03:00
The IDB brings together experts from the region to discuss options Millions of Latin Americans run the risk of poverty during their retirement if the region’s countries do not reform their pension systems, according to experts from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The reasons: increased life expectancy, a significant drop in birth rates, and the region’s large informal labor market.