Mexico’s Salud Digna: Preventive Care at Affordable Prices

Monday, April 8, 2013 - 03:00
One of the biggest challenges for public health systems in Latin America and the Caribbean is the rise of chronic and non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Overwhelmed by growing demand, public primary care units and hospitals are unable to provide timely diagnostic services such as blood tests and mammograms that would allow low-income patients to identify and treat their conditions.

Finding Ways to Change Eating Habits in Bolivia

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Nearly one in three children under the age of five in Bolivia suffers from stunting—a result of chronic malnutrition—the second highest rate in Latin America and the Caribbean. Poverty and lack of health systems that provide the right supplements are the most commonly cited reasons for the problem, but lack of awareness and behavioral issues related to nutrition are factors as well.

Cost-Effective Investment in Neglected Tropical Diseases in Mexico

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
At the end of 2011, Maria Rodriguez, who lives in the mountains in Huixtán in Chiapas, Mexico, started having such serious problems with her eyes that she could barely do her daily chores such as cooking and preparing her children for school.

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 03:00
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

IDB integrates efforts to fight Neglected Tropical Diseases

Monday, April 23, 2012 - 03:00
Efforts include actions to prevent and control neglected tropical diseases, currently affecting more than 200 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean

A water turnaround in Haiti

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 03:00
Before the project started in 2008, Saint Marc had running water for nine hours a week, at best. At present service is up to 10 hours a day—the highest average in any urban area in Haiti.

New hospital improves care for patients in Mexico’s Tepic

Thursday, October 6, 2011 - 03:00
Tertiary care hospital built with IDB financing gives access to state-of-the-art care Not long ago, patients in need of specialized services in Tepic, the capital of the Mexican state of Nayarit, had to travel for over one hour by ambulance to get treatment in the nearest hospital in Guadalajara. Such long distance added significant health risks and financial costs for patients seeking both specialized and emergency care.

Healthcare squad members saving lives in Chiapas

Friday, September 16, 2011 - 03:00
The IDB tropical diseases program provides services to 130,000 people in 13 indigenous communities of Mexico Marcela Gómez is a trilingual healthcare squad member: she speaks Tzotzil, Tzeltal, and Spanish. Along with her fellow healthcare squad members, she covers kilometers of jungle paths day after day to reach the most remote homes in southern Mexico. On their journey, they dodge dog and mosquito bites, but nothing makes them lose sight of the objective: to save lives.

Child Health Week in Haiti

Thursday, January 20, 2011 - 03:00
During the second week of November, despite the growing unrest that preceded the general elections, Haiti launched a vast campaign to deliver vitamin A supplements, de-worming capsules and vaccines to children aged 5 and under. The effort to reach more than one million infants also sought to contain the cholera outbreak by distributing oral rehydration salts and disseminating information on preventing and treating that disease.

Guyana: A healthy future, one sprinkle at a time

Monday, September 27, 2010 - 03:00
By Leticia Ramjag and Joylin Greaves Bibi Ramcharran registered at the Herstelling Health Centre when she learnt she was pregnant. She then continued to visit the clinic with her daughter, Aneisa, who is now a healthy 14-month old girl.