Young people with big ideas that transform society

Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 03:00
Participate and follow us on Twitter using @bidjuventud How does one solve old problems? With new ideas PANAMA CITY – We must listen to the voices of young people, with their fresh ideas and their plans for the future. And especially in Latin America and the Caribbean, the region with the world’s youngest population, where the average age is only 27.

Peru’s agriculture gets a boost from IDB-backed projects

Friday, August 27, 2010 - 03:00
Five days a week, Liz Villanueva, a biologist at Peru’s Agricultural Health Service (SENASA), oversees the care of a few hundred million of fruit flies. Less than a quarter inch long, these insects are one of the world’s most dreaded pests, and were once responsible for millions of dollars in crop losses in Peru every year.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Latinos from the Far East

Wednesday, March 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

Using the classroom to fight for peace

Sunday, January 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Charo QuesadaWhen war, natural disasters, economic crises or violence afflict a society, the education system is usually one of the first institutions to fall into disarray. Yet case after case has shown that in the wake of these disturbances, the presence and continuity of educational programs is crucial to rebuilding the social fabric.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 03:00
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

When good intentions bring bad results

Friday, March 18, 2005 - 03:00
Many subsidies aimed at helping the underprivileged benefit the rich instead of the poor, according to professor Ramon Lopez from the University of Maryland's Agricultural and Resource Economics Department. And he has 15 years of empirical data in 10 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean to prove it. According to his study, presented at IDB headquarters, some 45 percent of rural public expenditure in the region between 1985 and 2000 was spent on non-social subsidies, imposing a dramatic cost in efficiency, social equity and environmental decay in rural areas.

Listeners from the heart of the Amazon

Thursday, September 2, 2004 - 03:00
Every morning, the Peruvian Amazon wakes up listening to the radio. Radio is the highest reaching media outlet in the area: 81 percent of the population listens to radio programs and newscasts, according to a study in the area of Loreto. “Here in my community, Mrs. Norita is doing real well with her fish farm,” says a woman in a letter that´s being read on air. “When she sells her fish, she is going to send her daughter to school so she can get ahead and be something in life.”

Profile of the young Latin American entrepreneur

Monday, July 26, 2004 - 03:00
They belong to the middle class, have university degrees and on average begin to think about being entrepreneurs at 25, but they do not open their first company until about 5 years later. These are the characteristics that define the young Latin American entrepreneurs, according to a recent study by the Inter-American Development Bank that is the subject of the book Desarrollo Emprendedor (published in Spanish and available in English in the fall).

Education can't wait

Friday, March 5, 2004 - 03:00
Even in times of war and civil strife, governments, civil society organizations, communities and donor countries must continue to place a high priority on education. The investment will pay off when the inevitable peace process arrives, and society and the country will be in a much better position to heal the wounds of conflict and regain momentum for economic and social development.