Haitian school's reconstruction starts

Friday, December 23, 2011 - 03:00
A Trinidadian bank offers mountain village kids broader horizons If all goes according to plan, by the time the next academic year begins in September, Furcy will have a brand new public school. The facility, which will replace the old one toppled by the 2010 earthquake, will be built following strict construction standards. And as its principal, Francius Saintilus, remarked at a recent groundbreaking ceremony, the new school will have a big impact in this village in the mountains behind Port-au-Prince.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

Monday, September 27, 2010 - 03:00
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Latinos from the Far East

Wednesday, March 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

Education and social development through the arts

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 - 03:00
Identifying the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the Caribbean is one of the most critical challenges. The Caribbean region is second to Africa in this regard. In response to create HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) awareness, a performing arts program in the Caribbean takes central stage, making young people aware of social risks, highlighting the need for prevention and the promotion of social development. The program, merging cultural expression with social needs, has been particularly successful in raising awareness about the risks and prevention of HIV infection.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 03:00
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

Mainstreaming technical training for low-income women

Tuesday, December 21, 2004 - 03:00
Many poor women in Latin America have trouble entering the labor market. A pilot program to increase women's employability in the region has strengthened training for women in technical schools and improved the quality, opportunities and gender equity in technical training and in the labor market.

Profile of the young Latin American entrepreneur

Monday, July 26, 2004 - 03:00
They belong to the middle class, have university degrees and on average begin to think about being entrepreneurs at 25, but they do not open their first company until about 5 years later. These are the characteristics that define the young Latin American entrepreneurs, according to a recent study by the Inter-American Development Bank that is the subject of the book Desarrollo Emprendedor (published in Spanish and available in English in the fall).

It’s bigger than we thought

Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 03:00
Agriculture’s performance and its contribution to economic development has traditionally been undervalued, according to a recent study commissioned by the Inter-Agency Working Group for Rural Development in Latin America and the Caribbean. As measured by Agricultural Gross Domestic Product, agriculture only includes information about the sale of raw materials, mainly crops and livestock. Its upstream and downstream linkages with agroindustry, services and trade, are not considered, nor the value added generated by these linkages throughout the economy.