How Land Titling Can Boost Access to Credit for Farmers in Ecuador

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 03:00
For more than 70 years, the Herrera family has owned and farmed 300 hectares in the municipality of Pimampiro in northern Ecuador. The family had a deed for the land but it provided few details about the exact property lines, which areas had been set aside as protected areas, and in which parts farming was allowed.

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 03:00
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Improving avenues towards post-secondary and higher education for indigenous people

Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 03:00
Considering the sheer diversity of indigenous peoples and languages in Ecuador, Colombia, Guatemala and Nicaragua, with 22 different languages spoken among the majority (60 percent) Mayan population in Guatemala alone, it seems logical that terms like multiethnic, multilingual and culturally pluralistic would be used to describe their national compositions.

Latinos from the Far East

Wednesday, March 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

Getting an early start in life

Tuesday, January 24, 2006 - 03:00
There is ample literature on the impacts of early childhood development (ECD) programs in the US, whether examining small pilot programs, like the Perry Preschool Program, which has been tracking the lives of participants since 1962, or larger-scale initiatives like nationwide Head Start. Whatever the scope of the program, all point to the potential long-term benefits of investing in early childhood development, including higher educational attainment, better employment outcomes, higher earnings and lower levels of criminality.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 03:00
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

When good intentions bring bad results

Friday, March 18, 2005 - 03:00
Many subsidies aimed at helping the underprivileged benefit the rich instead of the poor, according to professor Ramon Lopez from the University of Maryland's Agricultural and Resource Economics Department. And he has 15 years of empirical data in 10 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean to prove it. According to his study, presented at IDB headquarters, some 45 percent of rural public expenditure in the region between 1985 and 2000 was spent on non-social subsidies, imposing a dramatic cost in efficiency, social equity and environmental decay in rural areas.

Mainstreaming technical training for low-income women

Tuesday, December 21, 2004 - 03:00
Many poor women in Latin America have trouble entering the labor market. A pilot program to increase women's employability in the region has strengthened training for women in technical schools and improved the quality, opportunities and gender equity in technical training and in the labor market.

Profile of the young Latin American entrepreneur

Monday, July 26, 2004 - 03:00
They belong to the middle class, have university degrees and on average begin to think about being entrepreneurs at 25, but they do not open their first company until about 5 years later. These are the characteristics that define the young Latin American entrepreneurs, according to a recent study by the Inter-American Development Bank that is the subject of the book Desarrollo Emprendedor (published in Spanish and available in English in the fall).