Renewable energy to power irrigation in the Atacama desert

Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 03:00
With support from the IDB, Subsole will be the first company in Chile’s fruit industry to use solar photovoltaic energy The Atacama desert is the driest place on earth and the region with the highest solar radiation on the planet. That’s where Subsole, one of the Chile’s largest locally owned exporters of table fruits, is planning its future growth, and it will use the power of solar energy and energy efficiency to achieve its goal.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Latinos from the Far East

Wednesday, March 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 03:00
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

The war against mealy peaches

Saturday, January 1, 2005 - 03:00
By Christina MacCulloch, Santiago, ChilePremium peaches that somehow become mealy and develop internal brown spots during shipment; table grapes that fall off the vine prematurely; wine grapes whose flavor is spoiled by viruses—these are the things that can keep Chilean grape and wine producers awake at night.

It’s bigger than we thought

Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 03:00
Agriculture’s performance and its contribution to economic development has traditionally been undervalued, according to a recent study commissioned by the Inter-Agency Working Group for Rural Development in Latin America and the Caribbean. As measured by Agricultural Gross Domestic Product, agriculture only includes information about the sale of raw materials, mainly crops and livestock. Its upstream and downstream linkages with agroindustry, services and trade, are not considered, nor the value added generated by these linkages throughout the economy.

The effects of child labor on learning

Thursday, July 3, 2003 - 03:00
Latin American countries have made a conscious effort to increase the percentage of children receiving formal instruction. Nevertheless, according to the latest household survey statistics, a significant amount of children combine school with work. For instance, in Brazil, Ecuador and Peru, the great majority of children are enrolled in school (95, 87 and 97 percent, respectively), but still a high percentage of children work (13, 34 and 28 percent).

Improving teaching quality in Latin America

Wednesday, May 7, 2003 - 03:00
Education systems in Latin America face a myriad of challenges, including the challenging conditions encountered by elementary school teachers. The teachers guide their students through a critical stage of development in which everything learned leaves an imprint and opens venues for new knowledge.