IDB study finds wide gender, ethnic wage gaps in Latin America

Monday, October 12, 2009 - 03:00
Afro-descendants, indigenous people earn 28% less than their white peers Males earn 17 percent more than females in the region when both have the same age, level of education Education is key to reduce ethnic wage inequalities in the region. Ethnic and gender wage differences remain significant in Latin America despite recent economic growth and policies aimed at reducing inequality, according to a newly released study by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Inter-American Development Bank named Best Multilateral by LatinFinance

Friday, November 7, 2008 - 03:00
LatinFinance, the leading source of financial market intelligence for the Latin American and the Caribbean, named the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) as the best multilateral institution this year. LatinFinance praised the bank’s efforts to finance the largest ongoing infra-structure projects in the region, highlighting the bank’s innovative lending instruments.

Latin Americans Satisfied With Education, Despite Quality Challenges

Monday, October 27, 2008 - 03:00
Most Latin Americans are satisfied with public education even though students from the region lag behind their peers from Asian and developed nations in international achievement tests, according to a Gallup poll commissioned by the Inter-American Development Bank.

Social programs boosting early childhood development

Monday, April 30, 2007 - 03:00
More than 200 million children worldwide fail to reach their potential in adulthood because of deficits in cognitive development in early childhood, according to a recent study. A handful of recent papers suggest that Latin America and the Caribbean faces large deficits in cognitive skills among children.

A regional forum for science and technology

Wednesday, January 3, 2007 - 03:00
With the launch of the Science, Technology, and Innovation Network next April, the IDB is taking steps to promote science and technology, key components in the development agenda for the countries in the region, in Latin America and the Caribbean. The IDB has played a historically strategic role in this mission, financing this sector with more than US$2 billion. This figure would be doubled if the investments in higher education and agricultural research were also included.

Laptops for the Majority

Friday, June 16, 2006 - 03:00
What’s the best way to move entire towns from poverty to the middle class? Buy each and every child in the community a $100 laptop computer, said MIT professor Nicholas Negroponte at a recent conference launching the IDB’s new Building Opportunity for the Majority initiative. Negroponte is also founder and chair of One Laptop per Child (OLPC), a non-profit organization that is working on developing these $100 laptops for low-income children around the world. 

Getting an early start in life

Tuesday, January 24, 2006 - 03:00
There is ample literature on the impacts of early childhood development (ECD) programs in the US, whether examining small pilot programs, like the Perry Preschool Program, which has been tracking the lives of participants since 1962, or larger-scale initiatives like nationwide Head Start. Whatever the scope of the program, all point to the potential long-term benefits of investing in early childhood development, including higher educational attainment, better employment outcomes, higher earnings and lower levels of criminality.

Improving and revitalizing education in Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, December 19, 2005 - 03:00
Inter-American Development Bank President Luis Alberto Moreno pledged decisive action to continue and expand the IDB’s support to improve and revitalize the education systems in Latin America and the Caribbean, placing a priority on improving teaching quality, promoting greater accountability, offering students more choice and encouraging private-public partnerships.

Filling the IT skills gap with Latin American youth

Friday, December 16, 2005 - 03:00
When visiting any Latin American city, it is hard to ignore the people selling t-shirts, toys, food and anything else imaginable in sidewalk markets, on street corners and the sides of highways. This type of livelihood in the informal sector has become a reality for millions of people in the region, a reflection of the lack of quality jobs and high levels of unemployment plaguing the region. What then are the prospects for disadvantaged young people attempting to enter the job market?

A closer look at poverty in Latin America

Tuesday, December 6, 2005 - 03:00
According to Jeffrey Sachs, in his recent presentation, “Next Steps in the Fight Against Poverty” at the IDB Forum of the Americas, Latin America is not that poor. It already possesses many of the foundations of economic success: Natural wealth, a highly urban population, high literacy rates, high levels of gender equality and geographically speaking, it is overwhelmingly coastal, miles of shoreline that can open many doors to trade and globalization.