Finding New Ways to Retain Teachers in Rural Mexico

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
In remote villages of rural Mexico, home to the country’s poorest and most marginalized populations, one of the biggest challenges to improve the quality of education decrease the attrition rate for those who teach there. Domingo Ruperto Díaz González, an 18-old primary teacher in Las Pilas, a rural village in the Mexican state of Chiapas, may hold the key to help solve the problem.

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 03:00
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Increased opportunities for higher education

Monday, June 27, 2011 - 03:00
Mexico's FINAE to expand student loan offerings, allowing more low-income students to get degrees and training that will lead to better jobs and brighter futures College degrees are hard to obtain in Mexico, especially for students from low-income families. Public universities have been unable to meet demand and many aspiring students do not earn enough to pay for tuition at private universities. As a result, only one in four Mexicans between the ages of 19 and 24 is enrolled in college—a number that drops to one in 30 for young people at the base of the pyramid.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

Monday, September 27, 2010 - 03:00
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Social programs boosting early childhood development

Monday, April 30, 2007 - 03:00
More than 200 million children worldwide fail to reach their potential in adulthood because of deficits in cognitive development in early childhood, according to a recent study. A handful of recent papers suggest that Latin America and the Caribbean faces large deficits in cognitive skills among children.

The Mayan world in the digital era

Friday, February 9, 2007 - 03:00
The past and future of Guatemala merge in the new IDB Cultural Center art exhibition, honoring the host country of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors of the Inter-American Development Bank. Unlike previous art exhibitions at the Cultural Center, the exhibition “Guatemala: Past and Future” is made up of multimedia presentations that portray key elements of Mayan culture in digitally restored versions.

Women on the challenges of being a scientist in Latin America and the Caribbean

Tuesday, January 16, 2007 - 03:00
Regardless of whether you’re a woman or a man, it’s not easy being a scientist in Latin America or the Caribbean (LAC).  Like anywhere else in the world, from the time one starts university it takes ten years of research and hard work just to earn a PhD in LAC, followed by several years working in postdoctoral fellowship positions.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 03:00
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

Three for success: tripartite partnerships

Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 03:00
The historic center of Mexico City needs to preserve its great historical and architectural value. The area is threatened by social and economic decline, ranging from abandonment of buildings in the area to high delinquency rates and street commerce. After many attempts to rescue the historic center, a new effort is underway to rescue the culture and colonial architecture, and nurture a fundamental bond among the community, the investors and the government.