The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

More growth or less inequality?

Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 03:00
Increased investment, low inflation, an improved fiscal situation, decreased unemployment. Latin America and the Caribbean have been hearing plenty of good news the past 18 months. A group of renowned economists analyzed the situation at a seminar hosted by the IDB Research Department to honor IDB President Enrique V. Iglesias, who will retire on September 30. Iglesias himself opened the seminar, which was chaired by IDB Chief Economist Guillermo Calvo, with the participation of Ricardo Hausmann, Michael Mussa, José Antonio Ocampo and John Williamson.

Donors pledge support to assist Latin American countries in CAFTA-DR trade agreement to improve compliance of labor standards

Wednesday, July 20, 2005 - 03:00
Donors pledged their support to assist six Latin American countries participating in the CAFTA-DR free trade agreement with the United States in improving the compliance and enforcement of international and national labor standards and legislation. Delegations from Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua met with donors at the headquarters of the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC to discuss their strategic priorities and specific goals they want to accomplish regarding labor law compliance and institutional strengthening.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 03:00
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

A New Government for the XXI Century

Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 03:00
These past ten years have seen many changes in the national and international level, a great improvement in women health, education, professional and intellectual development, citizen rights, and even women have won more positions in the government, allowing women such as Epsy Campbell to serve directly and with more influence to her fellow Costa Ricans. However, she recognizes that for her, as well as for many other women, enjoying those rights was not easy because in the personal level many times these changes can not be seen.

Don’t turn your back on Mother Nature

Friday, March 4, 2005 - 03:00
Between 1981 and 2000, Central and South America were the areas in the world  with the highest number of fatalities caused by natural disasters. The region accounted for over 100,000 deaths, more than 90 percent of the total recorded fatalities worldwide. Damage was estimated at a cost of around $24.2 billion, according to  the Landslide Observatory in the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology at the University of Maryland and the International Landslide Centre at the University of Durham in the United Kingdom.

Mainstreaming technical training for low-income women

Tuesday, December 21, 2004 - 03:00
Many poor women in Latin America have trouble entering the labor market. A pilot program to increase women's employability in the region has strengthened training for women in technical schools and improved the quality, opportunities and gender equity in technical training and in the labor market.

The double-edged sword of currency mismatches

Thursday, November 4, 2004 - 03:00
Doing business in dollars has proved to be risky many times over in Latin America. When the price of the dollar goes up, local exporting companies increase their income and therefore try to export more. But that same exchange rate depreciation spells trouble to all companies indebted in dollars, and big trouble to the ones who owe money in dollars and have income in local currency.

Profile of the young Latin American entrepreneur

Monday, July 26, 2004 - 03:00
They belong to the middle class, have university degrees and on average begin to think about being entrepreneurs at 25, but they do not open their first company until about 5 years later. These are the characteristics that define the young Latin American entrepreneurs, according to a recent study by the Inter-American Development Bank that is the subject of the book Desarrollo Emprendedor (published in Spanish and available in English in the fall).