Improving science and math learning in Argentina

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 03:00
IDB-based pilot project sheds light on new teaching approaches to improve learning in poor areas Since Latin America consistently underperforms in international student assessments, governments in the region are looking for pedagogical models to help improve student learning. The region’s students still perform below students in rich nations and East Asian countries, particularly in the areas of mathematics and natural science.

Learning through Play

Wednesday, November 10, 2010 - 03:00
It were the results of international tests that raised the red flag: students in Latin America ranked among the lowest performing in the world on standardized tests in Math and the Natural Sciences. In Argentina, the government decided to prioritize both of these subjects in its education policy.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

Monday, September 27, 2010 - 03:00
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Women on the challenges of being a scientist in Latin America and the Caribbean

Tuesday, January 16, 2007 - 03:00
Regardless of whether you’re a woman or a man, it’s not easy being a scientist in Latin America or the Caribbean (LAC).  Like anywhere else in the world, from the time one starts university it takes ten years of research and hard work just to earn a PhD in LAC, followed by several years working in postdoctoral fellowship positions.

Filling the IT skills gap with Latin American youth

Friday, December 16, 2005 - 03:00
When visiting any Latin American city, it is hard to ignore the people selling t-shirts, toys, food and anything else imaginable in sidewalk markets, on street corners and the sides of highways. This type of livelihood in the informal sector has become a reality for millions of people in the region, a reflection of the lack of quality jobs and high levels of unemployment plaguing the region. What then are the prospects for disadvantaged young people attempting to enter the job market?

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 03:00
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

Mainstreaming technical training for low-income women

Tuesday, December 21, 2004 - 03:00
Many poor women in Latin America have trouble entering the labor market. A pilot program to increase women's employability in the region has strengthened training for women in technical schools and improved the quality, opportunities and gender equity in technical training and in the labor market.

Profile of the young Latin American entrepreneur

Monday, July 26, 2004 - 03:00
They belong to the middle class, have university degrees and on average begin to think about being entrepreneurs at 25, but they do not open their first company until about 5 years later. These are the characteristics that define the young Latin American entrepreneurs, according to a recent study by the Inter-American Development Bank that is the subject of the book Desarrollo Emprendedor (published in Spanish and available in English in the fall).

The effects of child labor on learning

Thursday, July 3, 2003 - 03:00
Latin American countries have made a conscious effort to increase the percentage of children receiving formal instruction. Nevertheless, according to the latest household survey statistics, a significant amount of children combine school with work. For instance, in Brazil, Ecuador and Peru, the great majority of children are enrolled in school (95, 87 and 97 percent, respectively), but still a high percentage of children work (13, 34 and 28 percent).