Brazil’s Fisherwomen Mean Business

Friday, March 7, 2014 - 03:00
In Vila Castelo, a small town in the Brazilian state of Pará, fisherwomen are learning the ropes of fiscal management and entrepreneurship  Traditional fishing does not differ much today from what it has been since biblical times—a boat, a net, and a few men. Wait. Men? Maybe it has changed after all. At least in Vila Castelo, a tiny fishing village in Brazil’s state of Pará, women fish alongside men. 

More Than Cash Transfers: Training Jamaica’s Poor for Sustainable Employment

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Over the past two decades, several Latin American and Caribbean countries have transferred cash to poor families in exchange for meeting certain conditions, such as sending their children to school and visiting doctors regularly. These conditional cash transfers have improved the lives of millions of poor families. Today they are recognized as an effective tool to combat poverty and are used throughout the developing world.

Pioneering Data Initiative Aims to Measure Public Safety Conditions

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Determining the murder rate for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean is not an easy task. There are several sources that collect such data, from Interior Ministries to police and health departments, and each one uses a different methodology. As a result, murder rates can vary widely—the difference can be as high as 50 percent depending on the source and year.

What to Do about Lower Schooling Levels among Children without a Birth Certificate

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Birth registration is the very first step to social inclusion, since it officially records a child’s entry into the world and establishes his or her existence under the law. Someone without a birth certificateis at risk of lifelong exclusion from benefits and rights, including access to health services, conditional cash transfers, and pensions.

Panama and the IDB, partners for more than 50 years

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
More than five decades of collaboration to improve the quality of life of Panamanians and promote equitable development Panama has one of the most rapidly growing emerging economies of recent years. In 2012, the country’s economic growth in real terms was about 10 percent, the highest in Latin America and the Caribbean. The equally encouraging forecasts for this year place Panama in the group of countries with the greatest potential for economic expansion in the next decade.

Mayas, the flight through time

Wednesday, December 19, 2012 - 03:00
A new documentary shows how a 3,500-year-old culture remains vibrant in Mesoamerica When the Mayan people abandoned their cities of gleaming limestone in the 9th century AD, they took with them something far more enduring than monuments: They took their culture.  Over the centuries, as the forest reclaimed these vast temple complexes, the descendents of this great civilization continued to speak their ancestral languages, find meaning in the same cosmology, and even eat the same foods. 

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 03:00
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

United States and Latin America share experiences to prevent youth violence

Friday, September 14, 2012 - 14:01
Officials from the IDB and Latin America review lessons learned from U.S. youth programs The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) this week held a two-day training clinic with top specialists and law enforcement officials from the hemisphere, showcasing programs from Boston, Baltimore and San José, California as examples of best practices that could be adopted to help Latin America and the Caribbean combat youth crime.

Life Skills Count

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 - 03:00
Going beyond technical training to make at-risk youth employable There are 32 million young people in Latin America and the Caribbean—one in every five youth aged 15-29— that neither work nor study. In order to prepare these young people for workplace success, job training programs need to go beyond technical instruction and also teach “life skills,” such as communication, reliability, and teamwork.

A life beyond crime

Monday, August 27, 2012 - 18:30
A Jamaican citizen security program targets women involved in gangs For Pauline Crooks, quitting the Montego Bay gang that had helped her to put food on the table for six years wasn’t a quick or an easy decision. The single mother of three continued showing up at her “workplace”— where the gangsters ran lottery scams—even after she joined a parenting course offered by the Citizen Security and Justice Program (CSJP), an initiative launched in 2007 by Jamaica’s government to bring down crime in the island’s most violent communities.