Providing Credit to Latin America’s “Missing Middle”

Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 03:00
Join the discussion on twitter using #devthatworks There are approximately 34 million businesses in Latin America and the Caribbean, most of them small, informal, and with limited access to credit. Since they are unable to provide collateral, a reliable financial history, or accounting information, these businesses cannot meet the financial information requirements of commercial banks to obtain loans to improve and expand their operations.

How Land Titling Can Boost Access to Credit for Farmers in Ecuador

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 03:00
For more than 70 years, the Herrera family has owned and farmed 300 hectares in the municipality of Pimampiro in northern Ecuador. The family had a deed for the land but it provided few details about the exact property lines, which areas had been set aside as protected areas, and in which parts farming was allowed.

Banking the Unbanked in Colombia

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Approximately 35 percent of the Colombian adult population has no access to any formal financial services and are considered “unbanked,” according to the Colombian Banking Association. Some 79 percent of adults have no access to credit cards.

Want to Go Global? Try INTrade

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Access to information is key in today’s globalized world, especially for small and medium-sized companies seeking new markets for their products. To succeed, these firms have to navigate a series of trade agreements and regulations that economists have likened to being as messy as a bowl of spaghetti.

Pathways to China: The Story of Latin American Firms in the Chinese Market

Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 03:00
A new IDB study examines successful strategies adopted by dozens of pioneering exporters of goods and services HANGZHOU, China - Latin American companies that took a bold, early plunge into China are providing a valuable roadmap for scores of smaller firms that are eager to follow their example, according to a new study published by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) that explores the successful strategies used to tap one of the world’s largest and most dynamic markets.

IDB and People of African Descent in Latin America

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - 03:00
People of African descent represent 33% of the population of Latin America and the Caribbean, and an estimated 50% of them live in poverty. Latin America is one of the most unequal regions of the world. Inequality is partly explained by the lack of opportunities determined at birth by race and ethnicity. Inequalities have a direct impact on human development and overall economic development in Latin America and the Caribbean.

New IDB study: Korea offers trade, investment and policy lessons for Latin America and the Caribbean

Wednesday, October 19, 2011 - 03:00
Report commissioned for Korea-LAC Business Forum describes opportunities for greater engagement

IDB study examines potential for Brazil-Colombia integration

Wednesday, August 3, 2011 - 03:00
Beyond a boom that has pushed bilateral trade between Colombia and Brazil to $3 billion a year, both countries could tap enormous potential for growth if they addressed bottlenecks such as logistical costs and tariff barriers, according to a new study released by the Inter-American Development Bank’s Integration Department.

Improving housing conditions in Paraguay

Monday, June 27, 2011 - 03:00
An innovative way of allowing low-income families to afford home improvements

Increased opportunities for higher education

Monday, June 27, 2011 - 03:00
Mexico's FINAE to expand student loan offerings, allowing more low-income students to get degrees and training that will lead to better jobs and brighter futures College degrees are hard to obtain in Mexico, especially for students from low-income families. Public universities have been unable to meet demand and many aspiring students do not earn enough to pay for tuition at private universities. As a result, only one in four Mexicans between the ages of 19 and 24 is enrolled in college—a number that drops to one in 30 for young people at the base of the pyramid.