Haiti: design for development

Thursday, June 14, 2012 - 03:00
The IDB’s Multilateral Investment Fund, Donna Karan and others forge partnership to boost Haitian handcrafts value chain

IDB invites feedback on new project impact mechanism for communities

Wednesday, May 6, 2009 - 03:00
The Inter-American Development Bank today unveiled its new proposed Independent Consultation and Investigation Mechanism (ICIM)—the process through which affected communities can voice concerns about an IDB project. The ICIM is a draft proposal, which is open to public consultation for civil society groups and other actors to express their suggestions and provide feedback. The idea is to enhance and speed up the investigation process of external allegations.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

The Arts of the Caribbean

Friday, August 24, 2007 - 03:00
A selection of 39 artworks by recognized Caribbean artists will be on display in a new art exhibit at the IDB. This vibrant exhibit coming from a collection of two thousand works, of the Organization of American States (OAS) Art Museum of the Americas, features paintings, sculptures, drawings, engravings and photographs by masters such as Amelia Peláez, Juan José Sicre and Mario Carreño. The selection centers on countries that represent the Spanish, English, French and Dutch speaking Caribbean, offering a broad perspective of the region.

Latinos from the Far East

Wednesday, March 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

Support for Caribbean art

Wednesday, February 1, 2006 - 03:00
Although Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, it is home to extraordinary artistic and cultural riches. Even under very difficult conditions, culture continues to play a central role in the people’s daily lives.

A market with a view

Thursday, September 1, 2005 - 03:00
By Paul Constance, Délugé-Piatre, Haiti Traffic on the highway that runs up Haiti’s Western shore from Port-au-Prince used to come to a standstill at Délugé-Piatre, a pair of adjacent seaside communities some 70 km north of the capital.

Leading international efforts for development

Wednesday, July 21, 2004 - 03:00
The Inter-American Development Bank joined donor countries and multilateral agencies at an international conference held in Washington, D.C. to raise financial aid for priority programs for the political, economic and social recovery in Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere.

Aid in wake of deadly floods

Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 03:00
According to news reports, hundreds of people are either dead or missing in communities along the arid southern border between these Caribbean countries. The floods triggered by several days of torrential rains have also left thousands homeless in some of the island's poorest areas. IDB country offices in Santo Domingo and Port au Prince are in touch with Dominican and Haitian authorities, as well as international donors, to assess their nations' immediate needs and identify available loan resources that could be applied to assist the recovery.

Art of the diaspora

Tuesday, May 25, 2004 - 03:00
Many Haitians have left their homeland to build new lives in distant lands. Among them are the artists whose special vision is the subject of the exhibit Vive Haïti! : Contemporary Art of the Haitian Diaspora, presented by the IDB’s Cultural Center in recognition of Haiti’s bicentennial anniversary. “Because I was displaced, I’ll never be an unconscious Haitian,” said Edouard Duval-Carrié, one of the artists represented in the exhibition. “I am very bewildered by Haiti. I’m very in love with it, and I am trying to understand it.”