Innovation is the key to sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 03:00
The countries of Latin America and the Caribbean are making comparatively low investments in research and development, and the region’s private sector is also comparatively under-represented in R&D spending, according to a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank. Through a comparative analysis of R&D investments in developed countries, the study, entitled “The need to innovate,” concludes that companies in Latin America and the Caribbean have favored technology procurement strategies instead of promote endogenous generation of technology and new ideas.

Ministers call for more financial and institutional support for culture industries in Latin America and the Caribbean

Tuesday, October 19, 2010 - 03:00
Cultural industries are one of the fastest-growing sectors of the global economy, expanding at a projected rate of 8-10 percent over the coming decade. What does that mean for Latin America and the Caribbean?   The region has rich cultural heritage and dynamic cultural industries which continue to grow. But are countries doing enough to exploit the social and economic potential of the creative sector for development?

IDB study looks at export agency effectiveness

Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 03:00
Latin American and Caribbean export agencies have succeeded in supporting the diversification and expansion of exports but could be more effective, a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank shows.

Natural disaster risks remain high in Latin American and the Caribbean, IDB says

Thursday, September 30, 2010 - 03:00
Latin America and the Caribbean face potentially crippling economic and social costs from natural disasters and needs to do more to reduce risks and prepare government finances to respond to eventual catastrophes, according to a new set of indicators by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Young Agents of Change

Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 03:00
When Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, a Chilean, was in his twenties, he decided to protect the blue whale, this magnificent and endangered marine mammal. With the support of other young people, the marine biologist began a struggle that continues today to ensure that the Chilean government declared the coastal waters south of the country a protected area. "Things are changing", says a satisfied Hucke-Gaete.

IDB study suggests large natural disasters unlikely to affect long-term growth

Friday, June 18, 2010 - 03:00
Large natural disasters are unlikely to affect long-term economic growth unless they are followed by a radical disruption in the institutional organization of society, a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) suggests. The study, which analyses the impact of large natural disasters, sheds new light on whether these occurrences hurt long run economic growth. Current economic theories do not offer a clear answer.

High taxes and evasion eroding economic growth in Latin America and the Caribbean

Thursday, March 4, 2010 - 03:00
Complex tax systems and widespread evasion are distorting investment decisions by companies in Latin America and the Caribbean, reducing the efficiency of markets and preventing governments from investing in infrastructure, education and other key public goods. This hinders the productive possibilities of the region’s economies, according to a newly released study by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Expansionary Policies to Fight the Crisis Work, but not for all Countries

Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 03:00
The financial crisis has brought Keynesianism back to the center stage of the policy debate worldwide. Several Latin American and Caribbean nations are announcing their own fiscal stimulus packages to try to weather the latest global credit crunch. A new study by the Inter-American Development Bank shows that recessions are far less severe in countries with room to adopt more flexible monetary and fiscal policies. However, this is not something for all nations, as success depends on economic initial conditions at the time of the crisis.

Financial crisis seen lasting one to three years in Latin America and the Caribbean – Bankers poll

Thursday, February 12, 2009 - 03:00
A majority of Latin American and Caribbean bankers expect the crisis in financial markets to last between one and three years, according to the results of a poll released today by the Inter-American Development Bank and the Latin American Bank Federation (FELABAN). More than 100 executives from large, mid-size and small banks from 19 Latin American and Caribbean countries took part in the survey conducted at the end of 2008, after the global financial crisis started to hit this region.

Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases receives $34 million from Gates Foundation

Friday, January 30, 2009 - 03:00
Dramatic improvements in health care and living conditions have led Latin America and the Caribbean to swift epidemiological changes and a predominance of non-communicable diseases such as cancer and heart problems. But paradoxically, preventable infectious diseases continue to afflict the poorest and most vulnerable populations.