The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

More growth or less inequality?

Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 03:00
Increased investment, low inflation, an improved fiscal situation, decreased unemployment. Latin America and the Caribbean have been hearing plenty of good news the past 18 months. A group of renowned economists analyzed the situation at a seminar hosted by the IDB Research Department to honor IDB President Enrique V. Iglesias, who will retire on September 30. Iglesias himself opened the seminar, which was chaired by IDB Chief Economist Guillermo Calvo, with the participation of Ricardo Hausmann, Michael Mussa, José Antonio Ocampo and John Williamson.

The double-edged sword of currency mismatches

Thursday, November 4, 2004 - 03:00
Doing business in dollars has proved to be risky many times over in Latin America. When the price of the dollar goes up, local exporting companies increase their income and therefore try to export more. But that same exchange rate depreciation spells trouble to all companies indebted in dollars, and big trouble to the ones who owe money in dollars and have income in local currency.

Three keys for regulating public services

Monday, June 14, 2004 - 03:00
Three regulatory principles for promoting private investment and providing adequate coverage of public services were put forward by Sergio Espejo Yaksic, Supervisor of Electricity and Fuel in Chile, at a seminar held at the IDB. Using Chile's successful experience as a model, Espejo pointed out that sound regulation of rates was essential for promoting private investment in public services. Good regulation should enable investors to earn a reasonable profit, and at the same time ensure that consumers receive the services they need.

The multinational effect

Wednesday, January 21, 2004 - 03:00
Many people make the quick assumption that multinational firms’ investment is linked with negative economic effects in the host country, or reject the hypothesis that foreign direct investment accelerates productivity growth in domestic firms.