IDB ramps up financing for green projects in Latin America and the Caribbean

Friday, March 16, 2012 - 03:00
Participate in Twitter using #IDBmtg Bank approved record $736 million in loans last year for private sector projects in renewable energy and energy efficiency The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is ramping up lending for private sector projects related to renewable energy and energy efficiency to help bridge the gap for long-term financing for green investments in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Renewable energy to power irrigation in the Atacama desert

Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 03:00
With support from the IDB, Subsole will be the first company in Chile’s fruit industry to use solar photovoltaic energy The Atacama desert is the driest place on earth and the region with the highest solar radiation on the planet. That’s where Subsole, one of the Chile’s largest locally owned exporters of table fruits, is planning its future growth, and it will use the power of solar energy and energy efficiency to achieve its goal.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

What small companies need to grow

Wednesday, May 7, 2008 - 03:00
There are not many angel investors in Latin America and the Caribbean, and venture capital is not that available. But what the region does show is some impressive cases of high growth small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), providing interesting insights and ideas for policy advice.

Protecting the Little Guy

Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 03:00
What does the international promotion video of ChileCompra—the Chilean government’s web portal for public announcements of competitive bids—have in common with Peruvian police boots or with a stream of government contracts in the Bolivian city of Oruro? These are all cases of microenterprises participating in public bidding and competing with the big traditional suppliers.

Incubating entrepreneurs

Wednesday, February 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Nicole Keller Editor’s note: The writer of this article is the first-prize winner in the 2005 IDBAmérica Scholarship Competition. She studies journalism at the Pontífica Universidad Catolica de Chile. Sometimes it takes Mónica Civilo several hours to find the perfect shade of red. She mixes the paints, looks at them carefully and tries them out many times before she decides to put brush to wood.

Latin America moves ahead despite external threats

Monday, October 31, 2005 - 03:00
Many fear the possibility of interest rate hikes and a global recession if the “Chinese addiction” to buying dollars comes to an end, expressed the IDB Chief Economist, Guillermo Calvo. But the seven largest economies in Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela, also known as the LAC-7) are currently growing fast. Stock prices went up 174% in the past two years, bank credit and foreign investment are increasing, and commodity prices have also enjoyed a boost.

Chilean state bank succeeds in creating new source of employment

Thursday, September 1, 2005 - 03:00
During the late 90s, all of the glow associated with its booming past in the coal industry had worn off for the small Chilean town of Lota. The town's economic situation was so bad that migration was the only possible way out for its residents. Lota once enjoyed a thriving coal industry, but it no longer exists. However, the state-owned bank BancoEstado took the problem as an opportunity. With the idea of helping the city out of recession, the bank decided to improve its banking services.

The double-edged sword of currency mismatches

Thursday, November 4, 2004 - 03:00
Doing business in dollars has proved to be risky many times over in Latin America. When the price of the dollar goes up, local exporting companies increase their income and therefore try to export more. But that same exchange rate depreciation spells trouble to all companies indebted in dollars, and big trouble to the ones who owe money in dollars and have income in local currency.