The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Video art mirrors Latin American socioeconomic issues

Monday, December 4, 2006 - 03:00
The IDB Cultural Center opens its Third Inter-American Biennial of Video Art Exhibit on December 4 to broaden the discussion of economic and social issues in Latin America and the Caribbean through the creative channel of video art and documentaries.  This new video art exhibit, which runs through January 19, displays a great deal of diversity and offers different visions of current issues in the region, ranging from  faulty social policies and chaotic cities to ecological disasters.

Coming to fruition after forty years

Friday, June 9, 2006 - 03:00
While the famous prose of Chilean poet, Pablo Neruda, are irreversibly etched into the minds of many the world over, those recorded during an IDB-sponsored poetry recital back in 1966 were long forgotten—until recently.

Latinos from the Far East

Wednesday, March 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

Latin American art with Japanese roots

Tuesday, February 1, 2005 - 03:00
By Roger HamiltonThe Japanese immigrants who swept into Latin America at the turn of the 20th century were no different than those of other origins. Poor, out of opportunities and often out of luck, they saw the Americas as a land of hope and opportunity. Most of the newcomers were farmers, and they were content to work on plantations, first in Peru, and then in other countries, primarily Brazil. Many hoped that after a few years they could return to their homeland. Most remained.

Valparaíso and Buenos Aires: Cities to Preserve

Friday, February 7, 2003 - 03:00
Two Latin American cities, Valparaíso and Buenos Aires, came together at the lecture "The Conservation of 19th and 20th Century Monuments and Heritage" at IDB Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Ron van Oers, a Dutch urban planner with UNESCO's World Heritage Center, underscored the importance of the initiative undertaken by the Center to evaluate and preserve the cultural heritage of the 19th and 20th centuries. UNESCO has given hundreds of cultural and natural assets world heritage status, yet few represent recent centuries.