IDB fuels impact investing in Latin America

Monday, February 13, 2012 - 03:00
More than $110 million of impact investing resources were mobilized by the IDB over the past 18 months to finance profitable projects that bring about social change Despite stellar economic performance in recent years, Latin America and the Caribbean still have a long way to go to address pressing development needs, such as reducing poverty, improving educational outcomes and enhancing access to reliable health services.

How to make energy efficient blue jeans

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 03:00
IDB financing for renewable energy paves the way for denim maker in Ecuador to boost output while cutting energy costs One of the oldest traditional textile manufacturers in Ecuador, La Internacional S.A., is not only looking for the latest trends in denim fashion, but also looking for ways to become more competitive and grow in a sustainable way.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

Change in Habits?

Friday, December 28, 2007 - 03:00
By Diego Fonseca Ecuador indisputably holds first place in two different categories in Latin America. First, it is the top remittance-receiving Andean nation: some US$1.7 billion in 2005, equal to 4.8% of the country’s GDP. Second, its micro-lending market is one of the largest in the region. In 2005 alone, the country’s 61 regulated microfinance institutions approved more than US$1 billion in micro-loans, while 170 NGOs and 330 credit unions loaned another US$295 million.

Governments in microfinance: threat or opportunity?

Friday, November 9, 2007 - 03:00
By Peter BateFrom Microenterprise Americas magazine, Fall 2007

Promoting Nature- and Culture-Based Tourism

Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - 03:00
A reserve of 730 hectares of cloud forest in rural Ecuador is part of a community project known as Santa Lucía that seeks to conserve nature through ecotourism and generate new income for local campesino families who manage their own resources.

The winning card

Tuesday, September 6, 2005 - 03:00
Remittances and a cross-border network of businesses, nonprofits, credit unions, microfinance institutions and other financial players are connected through a debit and stored-value card platform that has one very simple result: everybody wins. The business model, combining efficient use of technology with cheaper remittances transactions and better business for financial institutions, was presented at IDB headquarters by UCLA professor and successful entrepreneur Raúl Hinojosa.

Basel II standards tailored to microfinance

Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 03:00
Once Basel II, an international agreement on banking regulation and supervision, is implemented, financial institutions in the signatory countries will have to increase their minimum capital requirements. Although many microfinance institutions are unregulated and therefore not required to meet any standards, banks and other financial institutions that provide microfinance may eventually have to operate under a regulatory system that includes the Basel II standards.