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With the support of the IDB and Compete Caribbean, Belize became the first country in the world to certify almost all its shrimp farms as free from forced labor and environmentally sustainable, as well as pioneering a nationwide biosafety protocol.

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If you’re like most people in the developed world, you probably take safe drinking water and sanitation for granted. But life is very different for 490 million people in Latin America, where millions of people still use outhouses.

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At the IDB we developed a new methodology to measure the environmental impact of protected agriculture in Mexico, which has increased access to credit through green bonds. Learn about José's story, and how his life changed after accessing financing tools.

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In Mesoamerica, which encompasses all Central America and Southern Mexico, more than half of the students do not finish high school. The key to reverse this trend is both inside and outside the classroom.

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The creative and cultural industries are both an economic force capable of boosting the development of Latin America and the Caribbean. But, above all, a powerful vehicle for the social inclusion of people with disabilities.

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An evaluation of Peru’s Finanzas en mi Colegio program, conducted by the IDB, revealed that the course improves students’ financial habits and knowledge and, surprisingly, also their teachers’.

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At the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), we are currently implementing and promoting a model of Economic Development with Identity of indigenous peoples which prioritizes the identity, territory and economic autonomy of indigenous communities.

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We built an interactive online platform to tell stories in a way that allows you to see life through the eyes of another person. The platform is called En Otros Zapatos (In Someone Else’s Shoes) and in this case we tell you the story of Antonia, an indigenous woman who belongs to the Misak people in Colombia.

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No inflation, no cry. Jamaica’s central bank is using reggae to teach people about monetary policy. Learn more about this here.