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Technology%20and%20Child%20Development%3A%20Evidence%20from%20the%20One%20Laptop%20per%20Child%20Program

Working Papers

Technology and Child Development: Evidence from the One Laptop per Child Program


Code:IDB-WP-304

Author(s):

Published: February 2012

Language: English

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Related topics:
Poverty Reduction and Labor

Abstract:

Although many countries are aggressively implementing the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) program, there is a lack of empirical evidence on its effects. This paper presents the impact of the first large-scale randomized evaluation of the OLPC program, using data collected after 15 months of implementation in 319 primary schools in rural Peru. The results indicate that the program increased the ratio of computers per student from 0.12 to 1.18 in treatment schools. This expansion in access translated into substantial increases in use both at school and at home. No evidence is found of effects on enrollment and test scores in Math and Language. Some positive effects are found, however, in general cognitive skills as measured by Raven’s Progressive Matrices, a verbal fluency test and a Coding test.

Related links:

Videos:
Efecto Naím: Una computadora no es una varita mágica para mejorar el rendimiento escolar

 

News:
NPR NewsOne Child, One Laptop ... And Mixed Results In Peru
3DNews.ruПрограмма «Каждому ребёнку — по ноутбуку» не улучшает знания
CSDNOLPC令人失望:未能提高儿童数学及阅读水平
Dziennik Internautóu, by Marcin MajLaptopy OLPC nie poprawiaja wyników nauczania - badania IDB
Download.BGOLPC не подобрява резултатите на учениците
Hack EducationThe Failure of One Laptop Per Child
Heise Online, by Oliver DiedrichOne Laptop per Child: Wenig Nutzen für die Schüler?
iNews24''어린이 한 명당 노트북 한 대'' 운동, 성과는?
Mashable, by Sarah Kessler2.5 Million Laptops Later, One Laptop Per Child Doesn’t Improve Test Scores [STUDY]
MoneyDJOLPC筆電對祕魯孩童的學習並沒有太大幫助
PC Magazine, by Mark HachmanStudy: OLPC Fails Students as a Tool for Education
Playtech.roOne Laptop per Child – un proiect… fara efect
The EconomistEducation in Peru, Error message: A disappointing return from an investment in computing
The Verge, by Dante D''OrazioOne Laptop per Child program not improving math or language test scores, according to study
TechNews.bgПроектът OLPC не прави децата по-умни

 

BLOGs:
Forbes IndiaFix That Fits: What is the Right Evaluation for Social Innovation?
IDB Education BLOGOLPC Peru: Learning from the experience (Also available in Spanish)
Educational Technology Debate BLOG, post by Amos CruzWhat Do OLPC Peru Results Mean for ICT in Education?
Educational Technology Debate BLOG, post by Carmen StrigelWhere is the Focus of OLPC in Peru and ICT4E in General?
Educational Technology Debate BLOG, post by Oscar BecerraOscar Becerra on OLPC Peru’s Long-Term Impact
Educational Technology Debate BLOG, post by Wayan VotaLet Us Discuss Results from a Randomized Control Trial of OLPC in Peru
ICTWorks BLOG, post by Wayan VotaWhat do Randomized Control Trial results from OLPC Peru mean for ICT4E?
IDB Effectiveness BLOG, post by Pablo IbarraránAnd the jury is back: One Laptop per Child is not enough
OLPC BLOG, post by Rodrigo ArboledaResponse to the Economist on OLPC in Peru
Technolgy Salon BLOG, post by Wayan VotaWhat Can We Learn From Randomized Control Trials of OLPC Peru
World Bank BLOG, post by Bruce WydickEvaluating The Best Ways to Give to the Poor
World Bank BLOG, post by Michael TrucanoEvaluating One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) in Peru

 

Related Research by JEL Codes:
(or click here to find research by JEL Codes)

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  • The Impact of Out-of-Home Childcare Centers on Early Childhood Development
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  • Does Technology in Schools Affect Repetition, Dropout and Enrollment? Evidence from Peru
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    Many developing countries are allocating significant resources to expanding technology access in schools. Whether these investments will translate into measurable educational improvements remains an open question because of the limited evidence available. This paper contributes to filling that gap by exploiting a large-scale public program that increased computer and Internet access in secondary p ... (View publication)

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